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The Importance of Mental Well-being

Written by Aaron Alston

After analysing claims data from TAL who are one of the leading insurers in the market, the number 1 type of claim lodged/accepted was mental health conditions which accounted for a total of 19% of all claims accepted.  It is evidently clear that many of us struggle to slow down in the increasingly fast-paced nature of the society we live in today.

The purpose of this article is to provide some insight and helpful tips/strategies that may assist in improving your mental well-being.  As I’m not a doctor, if you are struggling with your mental well-being, you may want to consider consulting a mental health professional.

% of Top 5 claims accepted by TAL

Source – https://www.tal.com.au/claims/claims-paid

  1. 19% Mental Health (i.e PTSD and depression) – 72% of all claims paid were Life or Income Protection claims.
  2. 17% Cancer (i.e breast and pancreatic cancer) – 89% of all claims paid were Life or Income Protection claims.
  3. 16% Injuries and fractures (i.e joint dislocation and bone fracture) – 82% of all claims paid were Life or Income Protection claims.
  4. 11% Musculoskeletal and connective tissue conditions (i.e back pain or sciatica) – 70% of all claims paid were Life or Income Protection claims.
  5. 10% Conditions of the circulatory system (i.e heart attack or stroke) – 88% of all claims paid were Life or Income Protection claims.

Strategies to improve mental wellbeing

Source – https://www.tal.com.au/slice-of-life-blog/proactive-steps-to-protect-your-mental-health

According to an article written by Glenn Baird who is TAL’s Head of Mental Health, there are 5 strategies to help improve your mental wellbeing.

“There are five simple actions that people can take which have been proven to improve wellbeing,” says Glenn. “I’d recommend looking at the following Five Ways to Wellbeing, originally developed by the New Economics Foundation, to see how they could fit into your life.”

  1. Connect with people. Strong relationships are the foundation of mental well-being. It may be spending more time with family and friends, or finally getting around to speaking to that colleague who works on the other side of the building, but connect with people as often as you can. Sites like Meetup are great if you’ve just arrived in a new place and are looking to build networks.
  2. Be active. “Always make time in your week to do some exercise. It could be social like a game of tennis, or just a walk in the great outdoors, but a healthy body is a healthy mind,” says Glenn. See some easy tips to help you get active on our Slice of Life blog.
  3. Keep learning. Stimulate your brain by picking up an old skill or trying out a new one. Now’s the time to learn a language or do that professional development course at work you’ve been thinking about.
  4. Give. Giving back to the local community or helping out a friend or colleague is a great way to boost your self-esteem and raise a smile.
  5. Take notice. This means taking the time for yourself to notice and appreciate what is around you. A great way to do this is through the mindfulness and meditation and calming breathing techniques recommended on our Slice of Life blog.

Summary

  • According to insurance claims data, mental health claims are increasingly on the rise.
  • There are strategies in this article sourced from TAL which may help improve your mental well-being.
  • If you are struggling with debilitating mental health and you have a TPD or Income Protection policy in place that is managed by Hudson, we can explore the possibility of an insurance claim.

 

 

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